nprfreshair:

When Zak Ebrahim was 7 years old, his father El Sayyid Nosair assassinated Meir Kahane, the militant ultra-orthodox anti-Arab rabbi who founded the Jewish Defense League. 
Then, from prison, three years later, Nosair helped plot the 1993 World Trade Center bombing — and was later convicted as one of the conspirators. 
Nosair’s terrorist acts sent the family into a downward spiral—and for much of his life, Ebrahim lied to people about his identity. In fact, he changed his name to distance himself from his father. 
His new memoir, The Terrorist’s Son, is about how he came to accept the truth about his father and seek out peace in his own life.
In today’s interview, Ebrahim talks about his father’s involvement with the 1993 WTC bombing and how that changed things:  

"I believe that from his prison cell he would often get visitors and have phone calls with many of the men who would eventually be involved in the World Trade Center bombing and involved in planning the attack.
When my father first went to prison [for the assassination of Meir Kahane], although he had maintained his innocence, there were certain people who thought he had done what he had done, namely because Kahane was seen as a very evil figure in particular in the Muslim community. …
I suppose I thought to myself that even if he was guilty that that was some sort of justification. It wasn’t until after the World Trade Center that it was very apparent that innocent people were being attacked — that even as a child I knew that was wrong and that I couldn’t accept any excuse for that. It was also when I realized that our family would no longer ever be together again.” 

Watch Ebrahim’s TED Talk, "I am the son of a terrorist. Here’s how I chose peace." 

nprfreshair:

When Zak Ebrahim was 7 years old, his father El Sayyid Nosair assassinated Meir Kahane, the militant ultra-orthodox anti-Arab rabbi who founded the Jewish Defense League. 

Then, from prison, three years later, Nosair helped plot the 1993 World Trade Center bombing — and was later convicted as one of the conspirators. 

Nosair’s terrorist acts sent the family into a downward spiral—and for much of his life, Ebrahim lied to people about his identity. In fact, he changed his name to distance himself from his father. 

His new memoir, The Terrorist’s Son, is about how he came to accept the truth about his father and seek out peace in his own life.

In today’s interview, Ebrahim talks about his father’s involvement with the 1993 WTC bombing and how that changed things:  

"I believe that from his prison cell he would often get visitors and have phone calls with many of the men who would eventually be involved in the World Trade Center bombing and involved in planning the attack.

When my father first went to prison [for the assassination of Meir Kahane], although he had maintained his innocence, there were certain people who thought he had done what he had done, namely because Kahane was seen as a very evil figure in particular in the Muslim community. …

I suppose I thought to myself that even if he was guilty that that was some sort of justification. It wasn’t until after the World Trade Center that it was very apparent that innocent people were being attacked — that even as a child I knew that was wrong and that I couldn’t accept any excuse for that. It was also when I realized that our family would no longer ever be together again.” 

Watch Ebrahim’s TED Talk, "I am the son of a terrorist. Here’s how I chose peace." 

(via npr)

ejayejay:

Prolly one of the illest episodes.

ejayejay:

Prolly one of the illest episodes.

(via solostwoyou)



buttonpoetry:

G. Yamazawa - “Elementary”

"I became a bully, because we all want to feel like America sometimes."

Performing for Beltway (D.C.) at the 2014 National Poetry Slam. Beltway won the tournament.

(Source: clfz, via kuriz)



coalgirls:

when u see ur crush outside of school

(via juhhwon)

npr:

Ferrero, the Nutella-maker, now a giant company based in Alba, Italy, uses about a quarter of the world’s hazelnut supply — more than 100,000 tons every year.
That’s pushed up hazelnut prices. And this year, after a late frost in Turkey that froze the hazelnut blossoms and cut the country’s hazelnut production in half, prices spiked even further. They’re up an additional 60 percent.
Because they’re so valuable, more people want to grow them. Farmers are growing hazelnuts in Chile and Australia. America’s hazelnut orchards in Oregon are expanding.
Thanks To Nutella, The World Needs More Hazelnuts
Photo credit: Ingrid Taylar/Flickr

npr:

Ferrero, the Nutella-maker, now a giant company based in Alba, Italy, uses about a quarter of the world’s hazelnut supply — more than 100,000 tons every year.

That’s pushed up hazelnut prices. And this year, after a late frost in Turkey that froze the hazelnut blossoms and cut the country’s hazelnut production in half, prices spiked even further. They’re up an additional 60 percent.

Because they’re so valuable, more people want to grow them. Farmers are growing hazelnuts in Chile and Australia. America’s hazelnut orchards in Oregon are expanding.

Thanks To Nutella, The World Needs More Hazelnuts

Photo credit: Ingrid Taylar/Flickr